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Longing to reclaim Welsh identity revealed in Brexit

Posted by on Aug 2, 2016 in Blog, Featured, News | 0 comments

CardiffBay

Cardiff Bay, Wales

Wales can seize EU departure to re-establish its rich culture

Nation still struggles for recognition while Irish & Scots dominate in the press

‘Remain’ vote strong in regions flush with outsiders where language and nationalism are waning

Wales gave a resounding vote of no confidence in the European Union during Britain’s June 23 referendum to leave the trading bloc. 

Brexit for the Welsh is a chance to peel back the surface layer of confounding, ethnic suppression that muddies our history and keeps our people from realizing economic and cultural independence. 

Citizens of what had once been thriving coal, steel and slate producing regions of Wales made their position clear with their votes – globalization has done them no favors, and they are leery about taking part in the bloc.

Welsh voters pushing, on the other hand, to remain in the EU largely hailed from regions populated by outsiders and immigrants, places like Cardiff, Vale of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, where the Welsh language and any sense of nationalism languish. Some in those regions worry now they’ll lose financial support Wales receives through the EU.

Wales for years has watched as growing reliance on technology has replaced literacy. A nation built on Christian faith with a rich history in language and some of the most beautiful music and poetry in the world is slowly being sucked into the pit of globalism, an idea if we follow to its conclusion, will leave us stripped of any semblance of national identity.

We asked Welsh author Terry Breverton, a former businessman turned academic, to share his thoughts on what Brexit means for the nation. In his response, he lamented the dwindling number of actual Welsh who live in Wales

“The best Welsh people leave to get better jobs in England and elsewhere, and in effect Wales has become ‘Europe’s Tibet,’” he said, going on to paint a bleak picture of Wales. Read Mr. Breverton’s full response here.
“(Wales) has among the worst health, housing, living standards, GDP per household and education statistics in Europe, partially owing to the influx of non-workers on benefits [Wales has the highest proportion of people on benefits in Britain] and partially because the Barnett Formula has for forty years skewed central government spending towards Northern Ireland and Scotland at the expense of Wales,” he said.
A global market, in most regards, is good for trade – businesses are much happier with an unfettered, open market. That’s why the British are now trying to find the sweet spot between open trade benefits and a firmer grip on borders and economic policy.

It’s important we stop here to draw a line between nationalism and belligerence. Recent citizen groups and news media report violence toward immigrants has spiked since the Brexit vote. Violence is obviously not what we’re talking about here, and we don’t condone it.

The Welsh long have lacked agency in Westminster. The Welsh long have watched their significance as a nation choked out while history is rewritten. The Welsh have sat idly by while their language, traditions and music have been shamefully diluted.
Restoring nationalism and identity for the Brits was one pillar of the “leave” campaign, but the English, the Irish and the Scots have taken center stage. Meanwhile, we the Welsh, the original Britons, have been quietly suppressed and stripped of our agency as a nation. Brexit can be the first step of many in restoring international recognition, but only if we use it correctly.

Cymru am byth!

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“The Brut” and King Arthur II – historic texts link ruler to Wales

Posted by on Jun 30, 2016 in Blog, News, Welsh History | 0 comments

Centuries-old manuscripts detailing the history of Great Britain tell the story of a warrior king who was crowned ruler of Glamorgan, a region in Southeastern Wales near present-day Cardiff.

Historians hesitate to admit whether King Arthur II actually existed, but most would scoff at the notion that he not only lived, but that he was really from Wales. However, one of the most comprehensive histories of early Britain, written by the scribes of the day and finally curated about a century ago, explain precisely the quests and victories of King Arthur and his roundtable knights.

“The Brut or The Chronicles of England: Part I” was compiled and annotated in 1906 by Friedrich W.D. Brie, Ph.D., for the Early English Text Society. It tells us that King Arthur was a king of Briton. It also tells us that he was a Welsh king – not English like so many scholars of British history believe.

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Dr. Brie culled from dozens of source manuscripts to compile the lengthy tome of more than 600 pages embracing the period from the arrival of Albyne, circa 1560 B.C., and Brutus, circa 504 B.C., to about 1480 A.D. Although there is some speculation about the accuracy of “The Brut,” scholars say it was the second-most copied text in 14th century Britain, second only to the Wycliffe Bible.

We know from other texts that Arthur lived in the sixth century. Following his conquest of France, Arthur divided up the land among his supporters then went home to Briton. It was then that the texts say he was “crowned king of Glamorgan.”

“The Brut” does not offer an account of Arthur’s death, only that he handed over his kingdom when he felt that he was no longer able to rule. There is evidence that King Arthur met his demise during a journey to America following a comet’s crossing over Briton and wreaking havoc in South America.

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British researchers working with The Welsh Cultural Endeavor have been knighted

Posted by on Jun 15, 2016 in Blog, Featured, News | 0 comments

We are pleased to announce that researchers in Britain who work closely with The Welsh Cultural Endeavor of Northeastern Pennsylvania have received high honors from a king whose own journey and plight to be recognized reflects their own.

Alan Wilson of Wales and Englishman Baram Blackett will be knighted, effective, June 29, 2016, by King Kigeli V of Rwanda. The date coincides with the king’s 80th birthday. Wilson and Blackett have been at the forefront of research into the true history of Wales and Britain despite criticism from their peers and academics, and now they are being honored for it.

For nearly four years, The Welsh Cultural Endeavor has been working to preserve and propagate a lifetime’s worth of research painstakingly gathered by Wilson and Blackett. In the rolling hills of Wales, the two have uncovered an ancient language, undeniable evidence of the first-century Christian church in Wales and proof that the famed King Arthur II, whose name and feats have been fictionalized and fantasized for centuries, was a warm-blooded Welshman who once traveled to America and died at the hands of attacking Native Americans in the sixth century.

George Horwatt, President of The Welsh Cultural Endeavor of Northeastern Pennsylvania, holds proclamations signed by King Kigeli V of Rwanda to knight Welsh Researchers Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett.

George Horwatt, President of The Welsh Cultural Endeavor of Northeastern Pennsylvania, holds proclamations signed by King Kigeli V of Rwanda to knight Welsh Researchers Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett.

 

King Kigeli V recognizes the efforts of Wilson and Blackett and reflected this in a proclamation. He commended the two for their meticulous forensic investigations, which were often completed at great personal cost. King Kigeli V has conveyed to them the Grand Cross of the Royal Order of the Lion of Rwanda.

George C. Horwatt, founder and President of The Welsh Cultural Endeavor, has been named the king’s emissary to Wilson and Blackett and has worked tirelessly to coordinate their knighting. Wilson and Blackett join the ranks of African leaders to be knighted by the Rwandan king, most notably the late South African President Nelson Mandela.

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“We only read the records. If it’s not in the records we don’t put it in the book. If it’s not on a piece of parchment or on a stone tablet or a … jug or on a grave or whatever, it doesn’t go in the book. If the site isn’t there on a map and you can’t stand on it, it doesn’t go in the book. We’re not interested in extrapolating or in interpreting or speculating in our research, be weird if we didn’t. It’s a seminal work. Nobody else has bothered for 300 years at least. We always admit the mistake – if we’ve made the mistake, we’ve got that wrong – and it’s the right way to go.” ~ Alan Wilson, during a 2010 conference in Bath, England

 

Since being granted political asylum in the U.S. in 1992, King Kigeli V, who has a United Nations resolution from the 1960s calling for his return to the throne, has lived a modest life outside of Washington, D.C., and he remains devoted to serving Rwandans throughout the diaspora resulting from the tribal tensions in the 1990s.

Much like the Rwandan king, Wilson and Blackett have long been denied legitimacy in Wales. As an organization committed to preserving Welsh heritage and culture in the United States, we see the truth in their findings and feel obligated to help protect the knowledge they have gathered. As an organization committed to preserving Welsh heritage and culture in the United States, we see the truth in their findings and feel obligated to help protect the knowledge they have gathered.

“In recognition of original research, often at great personal cost, demonstrating 40 years of meticulous forensic investigations into the beginnings of ancient Briton and that the famed King Arthur was two historical individuals, His Majesty King Kigeli V of Rwanda, the last king to reign in Rwanda, has awarded the Grand Cross of the Royal Order of the Lion of Rwanda to Alan Wilson and Anthony Thomas (Baram) Blackett. Other notable historical awardees of the same Order are Sir Conrad Swan, Garter Principal King of Arms; Sir James Carlisle, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda; His Majesty King Mwambutsa IV of Burundi; His Majesty Sir Edward Mutesa, King of Buganda; His Majesty King Hussein of Jordan; His Excellency Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa; His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia; and other awardees.” ~ Excerpt from proclamation announcing knighthood of Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett

“In recognition of original research, often at great personal cost, demonstrating 40 years of meticulous forensic investigations into the beginnings of ancient Britain and that the famed King Arthur was two historical individuals, His Majesty King Kigeli V of Rwanda, the last king to reign in Rwanda, has awarded the Grand Cross of the Royal Order of the Lion of Rwanda to Alan Wilson and Anthony Thomas (Baram) Blackett. Other notable historical awardees of the same Order are Sir Conrad Swan, Garter Principal King of Arms; Sir James Carlisle, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda; His Majesty King Mwambutsa IV of Burundi; His Majesty Sir Edward Mutesa, King of Buganda; His Majesty King Hussein of Jordan; His Excellency Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa; His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia; and other awardees.” ~ Statement from His Majesty’s Private Secretary regarding the knighthoods for Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett.
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King Arthur in America — Dr. Lee Pennington

Posted by on Jan 12, 2016 in Blog, News | 0 comments

World-renowned forensic historian, author and poet, Dr. Lee Pennington, from Louisville, Kentucky, presented discoveries made of the presence of King Arthur along with his brother, Prince Madoc, in America during the mid 6th century. A host of artifacts and records were on display.

Read more about Dr. Pennington.

The presentation took place on Saturday, March 26, in the Irem Temple Country Club, Dallas, and included a buffet dinner.

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